Old man on the street
Old man on the street
Writing a letter
Boy writing a letter
Girls on their mobiles
Girls on their mobiles
Photographing an event
Photographing an event
Girl with laptop
Girl with laptop
Man on phone
Man on phone
Clothing on a rail
Clothing on a rail
Shopping at a market
Shopping at a market
Girl on phone
Girl on phone
Market Seller
Market Seller
People at a station
People at a station
Busy street
Busy street
Earth from space
Earth from space
Man on Laptop
Man on laptop
Man on mobile
Man on mobile
Man on laptop
Man on laptop
Construction workers
Construction workers
Girls on mobiles
Girls on mobiles
Kids on mobiles
Kids on mobiles
Girls on mobiles
Girls on mobiles
Man in a hat
Man in a hat
British postbox
British postbox
Cartwheel on a beach
Cartwheel on a beach
Woman on a phone
Woman on a phone
Monopoly board
Monopoly board
Woman
Woman
People in office
People in office
Video recording
Video recording
Men talking
Men talking
Woman
Woman
On a tablet
On a tablet
People
People
Woman on bench
Woman on bench
Man waiting for train
Man waiting for train
Something
Something
Woman
Woman
Busy street
Busy street
JMS Connect
JMS Connect
JMS Innov8
JMS Innov8
JMS Inspire
JMS Inspire
JMS Shout
JMS Shout
JMS SEO Thermostat
JMS SEO Thermostat

Data Protection Law Briefing

Data protection laws are key to the increase in data storage, and intrusion into our privacy. The Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA) forms, with its retinue of subordinate regulations, an opaque and often tedious body of law. But it forms an important part of the online law. According to the Information Commissioner: "the Data Protection Act gives individuals the right to know what information is held about them, and it provides a framework to ensure that personal information is handled properly." It is concerned with misuse of personal information by commercial organisations, rather than by government.

Data protection law is the cause behind the ubiquitous website privacy policy or statement. The main purpose of these statements is to fulfil the information disclosure requirements of the 1998 Act.

Eight Principles

  1. Personal data shall be processed fairly and lawfully and, in particular, shall not be processed unless:
    • At least one of the conditions in Schedule 2 is met, and
    • in the case of sensitive personal data, at least one of the conditions in Schedule 3 is also met.
  2. Personal data shall be obtained only for one or more specified and lawful purposes, and shall not be further processed in any manner incompatible with that purpose or those purposes.
  3. Personal data shall be adequate, relevant and not excessive in relation to the purpose or purposes for which they are processed.
  4. Personal data shall be accurate and, where necessary, kept up to date.
  5. Personal data processed for any purpose or purposes shall not be kept for longer than is necessary for that purpose or those purposes.
  6. Personal data shall be processed in accordance with the rights of data subjects under this Act.
  7. Appropriate technical and organisational measures shall be taken against unauthorised or unlawful processing of personal data and against accidental loss or destruction of, or damage to, personal data.
  8. Personal data shall not be transferred to a country or territory outside the European Economic Area unless that country or territory ensures an adequate level of protection for the rights and freedoms of data subjects in relation to the processing of personal data.

Useful Links

 


Glossary: Can-Spam, Customer Relationship Marketing, Database, Database Marketing, Data Protection Act, Digital Marketing, Direct Mail, Direct Marketing, Email Harvesting, Email Marketing, e-Marketing, E-Privacy Directive, Opt-in, Opt-in Email, Pharming, Phishing, Privacy, Siphoning, Spam, Spamhaus Block List, Spyware, Trojan Virus, Troll, Trust, Unique Visitor, Website

Internet of Manufacturing
  Tue 6th Mar/2018
    3:00 pm - 11:30 pm