Old man on the street
Old man on the street
Writing a letter
Boy writing a letter
Girls on their mobiles
Girls on their mobiles
Photographing an event
Photographing an event
Girl with laptop
Girl with laptop
Man on phone
Man on phone
Clothing on a rail
Clothing on a rail
Shopping at a market
Shopping at a market
Girl on phone
Girl on phone
Market Seller
Market Seller
People at a station
People at a station
Busy street
Busy street
Earth from space
Earth from space
Man on Laptop
Man on laptop
Man on mobile
Man on mobile
Man on laptop
Man on laptop
Construction workers
Construction workers
Girls on mobiles
Girls on mobiles
Kids on mobiles
Kids on mobiles
Girls on mobiles
Girls on mobiles
Man in a hat
Man in a hat
British postbox
British postbox
Cartwheel on a beach
Cartwheel on a beach
Woman on a phone
Woman on a phone
Monopoly board
Monopoly board
Woman
Woman
People in office
People in office
Video recording
Video recording
Men talking
Men talking
Woman
Woman
On a tablet
On a tablet
People
People
Woman on bench
Woman on bench
Man waiting for train
Man waiting for train
Something
Something
Woman
Woman
Busy street
Busy street
JMS Connect
JMS Connect
JMS Innov8
JMS Innov8
JMS Inspire
JMS Inspire
JMS Shout
JMS Shout
JMS SEO Thermostat
JMS SEO Thermostat

Marketing to Children Law Briefing

Marketing to children is contentious to say the least, but an understanding of the law is vital for marketers. The UK Government is particularly concerned that businesses comply with marketing codes of behaviour (many of which are voluntary) governing the way they advertise and promote items to children. For example it is illegal to promote cigarettes and alcohol to children. Indeed all smoking-related products carry government health warnings. Junk food is now also being scrutinised as an undesirable marketing product to be advertised to and at children all over the world.

There are growing numbers of children online, so online protection is becoming the most important element of marketing law in this area. According to a recent report, some 16 million young people under age 18 are online, and over 6 million of these are children aged 12 and under.

Children, like adults, are online, visiting stores - as well as using email, gaming software, chat systems, social media networks and message boards. But, unlike adults, children often don't know how to recognise unsafe situations or invalid claims. Children are surprisingly susceptible to things that blink or are animated, look like games, can be personalised, or "do something" or even simply say "click here." Some unscrupulous Internet companies exploit children's trusting nature by enticing them to share private information. Children need help with their privacy and security online. If parents decide to allow their children to use the Internet to buy online, they should make sure their children understand how to use and make purchases safely and responsibly.

As a result of this, the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA), went into effect on April 21, 2000 in the US. This law requires certain commercial websites to post a privacy policy, obtain verifiable parental consent for a child's information to be submitted online, and offer options regarding disclosure of that information to third parties. The act allows civil penalties for violations. The UK is currently debating a rating system such as seen in the movies.

Useful Links

 


Glossary: 121 Marketing, Ad Inventory, Ad Server, Advertising, AIDA Marketing Communications Model, Ambush Marketing, Astroturfing, Call to Action, Campaign, Chat, Chat Room, Customer Relationship Marketing, Dark Marketing, Data Protection Act, Database, Database Marketing, Direct Mail, Direct Marketing, Email, Email Marketing, E-Privacy Directive, Market Research, Opt-in, Opt-in Email, Permission Marketing, Privacy, Relationship Marketing, Social Media, Trust

Internet of Manufacturing
  Tue 6th Mar/2018
    3:00 pm - 11:30 pm